Morning at Greenwich Point

2021.01.27: Looking East at the Long Island Sound from Tod’s Point beach (Canon Rebel T2i, 18mm, f/3.5, 1/30 s, ISO 200)

Greenwich Point is it’s official name, but almost everyone I know calls it Tod’s Point or, simply, Tod’s. Through the years it has been called by several names:

  • Prior to 1640 it was known as Monakawaye.
  • Some time after 1640 it became Elizabeth’s Neck – that name coming from Elizabeth Feaks one of the first settlers in Greenwich and who, ‘under the first Indian deed,’ became a part owner of the property.
  • Old Greenwich Point was the next name it had.
  • In the 1880’s and 90’s a New York banker started buying land plots on the point until he, basically, owned it all and it became known as Tod’s Point or, as Tod called his residence at the point, ‘Innis Arden’ (not the Innis Arden we are familiar with today in Greenwich).
  • In 1945 the Town of Greenwich bought the property and changed the name to Greenwich Point.

It’s a large property (about 140 acres); not as varied in the number of walking trails as, say, the smaller Pomerance; but still rich in things to see and do. There are:

  • the beach
  • remnants of the old Innis Arden estate
  • beautiful gardens maintained by the Garden Club of Old Greenwich
  • wildlife: deer, egrets, cormorants, seagulls, (pesky) Canadian geese, and horseshoe crabs come on shore on the beaches (unfortunately many die on the rocks, too)

On most days you can see Manhattan from the Point; on clear days (and evenings) that view is amazing!

The best thing about the point: the sunrises! Almost everyone from Greenwich with an Instagram account has posted at least one picture taken of the sunrise from Tod’s Point. Scroll through mine and you’ll find a period two summers ago when there were at least three almost every day

2021.01.27: Snow on the Beach at Tod’s Point (Canon Rebel T2i, 18mm, f/16, 30.0 s, ISO 200)

I took a walk there this morning to see what the beach would look like after last night’s snow. I wanted to get there before sunrise (7:09 today), though not expecting much from it because of the clouds. I was fortunate that the skies cleared up enough to get a few decent pictures, though.

2021.01.27: Fire, Water and Snow – Rising Sun at Greenwich Point (iPhoneXR, 4.25mm, f/1.8, 1/117s, ISO 100)

Because of the shoes I wore, I didn’t do much more than walk along the shore this morning experimenting with different shutter speeds and playing around.

2021.01.27: Spume at long exposure (Canon Rebel T2i, 24mm, f/16, 10.0 s, ISO 200)
2021.01.27: Spume via iPhone (iPhoneXR, 24mm, f/1.8, 1/29s, ISO 800)

2021.01.27: The Pavilion at Tod’s Point (Canon Rebel T2i, 18mm, f/16, 30.0 s, ISO 200)
2021.01.27: Took an 8 second exposure in which I ran in front of the lease and stood there for about 4 (Canon Rebel T2i, 24mm, f/24, 8.0 s, ISO 200)
1925 – J. Kennedy Tod from The Quarterly Magazine; July, 1925 (Vol. XIX, No. 4); published by the Columbia University-Presbyterian Hospital Alumnae Association

SIDE NOTE/FUN FACT: in 1906 Mr. & Mrs. Tod began offering the use of Innis Arden Cottage and a location on the property called ‘the Camp’ for the use of nurses from Columbia/Presbyterian as a weekend/summer getaway for a fee of $1.00 paid to the school. The practice continued well after his death in 1925 until at least the late 30s. The alumnae publication, The Quarterly Magazine, often published small pieces by some of those nurses relating their experiences at Innis Arden, including the time they tried to sing a song of thanks to Mr. Tod outside his office. Tod, being a very private man, did not open the door.

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